A long black cloud arrives in Hong Kong (and over Australia)

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Martin Moodie
Martin Moodie is the Founder & Chairman of The Moodie Report.

From the south of France to the South China Sea – The Moodie Blog is on the move again.
There’s not many things that will tear us away from the TFWA World Exhibition in Cannes before the show is over but a first-ever (non-World Cup) rugby international between the All Blacks and Australia on neutral turf is certainly one of them.

We joined a large contingent from DFS (including a suprisingly sizable Kiwi contingent led by Craig McKenna and Maryanne Igasan) at the match and what an occasion it was. History in the making as one of the world’s great sporting rivalries was played out toe-to-toe – almost literally during the All Blacks’ rendition of the legendary haka (below).

On the day black was the dominant colour on and off the field. Pictured below are (from left) Craig McKenna, his son Jerrod, The Moodie Report Publisher, Kathryn McKenna and – the one non-Kiwi – DFS Chairman and CEO Ed Brennan.

And the result? I thought you’d never ask…

Australia started strongly, leading 14-6 late in the first-half but the All Blacks came storming back in inimitable style to take out the test match by 19-14. The Aussies were unlucky for sure (finally a forward pass ruling that went in our favour) but we’ll take the win nonetheless. Now it’s on to Scotland, Ireland, Wales and England for an attempt at the famed ‘Grand Slam’. The Moodie Blog may just find a way to tag along…

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  • Your team were lucky. I guess the strength of the NZ$ help in paying for the ref!

    Cheers,
    Looking forward to seeing the results of the tour!

  • Hi Martin,
    I was hoping that this was not going to be brought up but little else in NZ sport to cheer about. Cricket and league all below par.
    This is the green/gold development squad for next world cup which is when it all counts and the fact it will be on NZ soil means there are no excuses for AB failure.
    Regards,

    James